Blog

Stensgata 1

Posted by on 09:15 in Blog, Case Study, Contributors, Successful BIM Projects | 0 comments

Stensgata 1

During the autumn of 2014 the Norwegian Building Authorities, the commonhold Stensgata 1 w/me, Tor Hojem, Sweco BIM lab and Rendra AS got together to investigate how one could create a BIM of an existing residential building. This blog post is the first in a series of blog posts portraying how one commonhold goes from happy amateurs to critical users of BIM.   This old courtyard apartment complex constructed in 1890 has endured through good times and bad. Photographs taken one hundred years ago show that the façades have remained almost unchanged since the time it was built. The building was reorganised from a private limited company to a commonhold, following a bankruptcy in the early 1990s. Today the property is managed by the unit holders, who meet in their free time with the aim of safeguarding the value of the building in the best interests of the owners. Managing a property of this type is based on respect for its history.     It may be assumed that the property has been maintained by people who cared about it – the building contractor, freeholder, caretaker, private limited company and today’s unit holders. Someone has examined and recorded any damage, faults and defects and ensured that something was done about them.  As of today, the property should be managed in such a way that it will remain standing for another hundred years.   As newly elected board chairman in autumn 2014, I take this as my starting point. The initial sources of information about the daily running are accounting data ‒ invoices, statements of accounts, an overview of suppliers and financial status. I am retrieving information from The Norwegian Mapping Authority about the sectioning history and I can retrieve copies of drawings, some of them showing the property’s former history, from the Agency for Planning and Building Services.  The Oslo Fire Department has carried out an inspection and made a report with official orders and recommendations for the building owner. These are some of the sources of information about the property, and based on these, an overview will be prepared which takes us as the building management into the future.   Matters to be addressed as I assume my position as chairman of the board are the following: ongoing matters related to sectioning, concluding open agenda items following the Fire Department inspection, ongoing building matters regarding the extension of one of the sections, upgrading of the electrical installation, etc. The outgoing board had worked solidly to safeguard the interests of the unit holders and the property appears to be well run.      what is lacking is a good tool to pull the threads together to ensure focus and planning for the further running of the property   In my view, what is lacking is a good tool to pull the threads together to ensure focus and planning for the further running of the property. One-third of the housing in Norway is managed through commonholds, housing cooperatives and housing associations ‒ managed with good sense, and in line with old traditions, generally known as “community spirit”. Many people are proud of this tradition, and few question whether this is a good way to manage property.   New times have brought new requirements from homeowners for how they want to...

read more

Welcome to Digital Construction

Posted by on 12:36 in Blog | 0 comments

Welcome to Digital Construction

With growing concerns about the over all efficiency in the construction industry, there has never been a greater need for worldwide industry changes that lower costs and reduce waste and construction time. Through years of industry experience and cutting edge research, we have come to the conclusion that these changes can be enabled by the transition from traditional pen-and-paper workflow to digital workflow.   We, at the Rendra team, aim to inspire change and provoke useful debate, to help you make your work easier — and more efficient — by taking advantage of today’s available technology. Together with our network of friends in the industry, we will be providing you with the latest, most innovative and efficient breakthroughs in digital construction. We have hunted some of the industry’s most prolific digital ‘revolutionaries’ to contribute their knowledge on this blog. This is the beginning of a new online Digital Construction community.   We have hunted some of the industry’s most prolific digital ‘revolutionaries’ to contribute their knowledge on this blog. This is the beginning of a new online Digital Construction community.    Over the past few years, the Rendra team and our accomplices have been following and analyzing the current shift in the construction industry. We have been to numerous sites, to see digital construction in action, and our accomplices are among the most vocal contributors at conferences and discussions about the future of construction.   Our experience has taught us one absolutely crucial lesson — change is easy to talk about, but it’s much harder to actually follow through. Usually, this is not because people don’t want to change, or because people believe that change is a bad idea for the business. Rather, truly meaningful change is difficult because it requires such a comprehensive reappraisal of so many areas all at the same time. This means it is exceedingly difficult to coordinate a change among all the members of an entire construction team. Such change requires enormous amounts of planning and investment, as well as numerous meetings and follow-ups. Often, this can discourage us as we question whether or not such upheaval is actually worthwhile, especially when we are already under pressure to complete projects.   We have found that every company, that has been successful in this transition, has had at least one digital revolutionary — one ‘champion’ to lead the charge. These champions have found success by looking for what we call a ‘minimum viable change’ — a small, yet meaningful change that shows workers the possibilities that await them if they are prepared to pursue this transition further. Once workers at every level begin to see the benefits of digital construction, more and more people offer their support for the ongoing transformation of the company.   This blog will tell the success stories of these champions, showing their ingenious methods and ideas. Industry leaders will be contributing their extensive experience from digitizing their workflow. The blog will focus on the lessons they have learnt, giving you useful tips on how to make the transition as easy as possible, focusing on how digitization enables higher interoperability while working on site. We will also be holding debates about the drawbacks and benefits of digitizing workflows.   BIM technicians will be providing concrete, usable tips and video tutorials on...

read more